Students Active for Ending Rape

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All students have the right to a safe campus, free of sexual violence. SAFER empowers students to hold their universities accountable for having strong campus sexual assault policies and programming. We’re here to help you organize for change.

September 19, 2014 at 11:06am
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Its On Us →

September 16, 2014 at 8:29am
32 notes

Obama, Biden to launch 'It's On Us' campaign against college sexual assault, with focus on men →

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden plan to announce a campus sexual assault awareness campaign from the White House Friday, with a special focus on engaging men in the fight against a largely hidden problem.

White House officials say the campaign, called “It’s On Us,” will challenge everyone on campuses to see sexual assault as their personal responsibility to prevent, but will particularly target male students. Presidential aides point to research shows that men are often reluctant to speak out against violence against women because they believe other men accept it, and that Obama and Biden hope to set an example by speaking out to help change social norms.

September 3, 2014 at 8:21am
151,022 notes
Reblogged from thepeoplesrecord

thepeoplesrecord:

Columbia student will carry her mattress until her rapist exits school
September 2, 2014

While most students at Columbia University will spend the first day of classes carrying backpacks and books, Emma Sulkowicz will start her semester on Tuesday with a far heavier burden. The senior plans on carrying an extra-long, twin-size mattress across the quad and through each New York City building – to every class, every day – until the man she says raped her moves off campus.

“I was raped in my own bed,” Sulkowicz told me the other day, as she was gearing up to head back to school in this, the year American colleges are finally, supposedly, ready to do something about sexual assault. “I could have taken my pillow, but I want people to see how it weighs down a person to be ignored by the school administration and harassed by police.”

Sulkowicz is one of three women who made complaints to Columbia against the same fellow senior, who was found “not responsible” in all three cases. She also filed a police report, but Sulkowicz was treated abysmally – by the cops, and by a Columbia disciplinary panel so uneducated about the scourge of campus violence that one panelist asked how it was possible to be anally raped without lubrication.

So Sulkowicz joined a federal complaint in April over Columbia’s mishandling of sexual misconduct cases, and she will hoist that mattress on her shoulders as part savvy activism, part performance art. “The administration can end the piece, by expelling him,” she says, “or he can, by leaving campus.”

Read more

As painful as I know the constant reminder of attending school with her rapist must be, I’m glad she won’t be the only one forced to remember. I hope the rapist drops out immediately…or better yet, I hope he faces the justice he deserves. 

September 2, 2014 at 1:43pm
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Beyond 'no means no': the future of campus rape prevention is 'yes means yes' | Jessica Valenti →

With the start of school underway, however, the biggest paradigm shift on rape and sexual consent in decades may just now be emerging in California, where “yes means yes” – a model for reform that feminists like me have been pushing for years – could soon become law.

Late last week, the first state bill to require colleges to adopt an “affirmative consent” model in their sexual assault policies passed the California senate unanimously. The legislation, which is headed to Governor Jerry Brown’s desk for approval by the end of this month (his office declined to comment), effectively requires the presence of a “yes” rather than the absence of a “no” – or else withholds funding from the nation’s largest state school system.

The legislation additionally clarifies that affirmative consent means both parties must be awake, conscious and not incapacitated from alcohol or drugs – and that past sexual encounters or a romantic relationship doesn’t imply consent. The California bill also, importantly, specifies that “lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent”.

It seems like a no-brainer to only have sex with conscious and enthusiastic partners, but detractors say the standard “micromanages” sexuality. The truth is that a “yes means yes” policy “helps to create a shared responsibility, instead of the responsibility falling on women to say ‘no’,” says Tracey Vitchers, chair of the board at Safer (Students Active for Ending Rape). Anti-violence activists are clearly excited about the bill, which – if all goes well – could be adopted by more states with large public university systems.

August 31, 2014 at 2:52pm
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Last week, a Stanford student told Bloomberg that women need to protect themselves from rape by staying sober, etc., since many people lock their bikes to prevent them from being stolen and apparently that is the same thing. 
So who is the type of person who thinks women should find a U-lock for their bodies?
Here’s what turns up when you Google the guy and take a peek at his Stanford Daily writer profile. As Alexandra at Feministing wrote, “No comment necessary.”

Last week, a Stanford student told Bloomberg that women need to protect themselves from rape by staying sober, etc., since many people lock their bikes to prevent them from being stolen and apparently that is the same thing. 

So who is the type of person who thinks women should find a U-lock for their bodies?

Here’s what turns up when you Google the guy and take a peek at his Stanford Daily writer profile. As Alexandra at Feministing wrote, “No comment necessary.”

2:43pm
2,266 notes

Let’s play out the scenario for the one in millions chance that someone in the presence of someone who wants to assault her is wearing the nail polish, coyly gets her finger into the drink, and spots the color change. Then what? How does it end? If this person is willing to go to such lengths to harm her, they won’t be phased by her setting her drink down. So let’s say she gets away or finds help. Does she call the police to report the activity of her fingernails? What happens when the next person this predator wants to harm opts for her favorite OPI shade that weekend?

How does it end?

It doesn’t; not with nail polish, anyway.

(…)This product does nothing to dismantle a culture of violence against women that demands we constantly become ever more vigilant against those who would do us harm. Undercover Colors, like so many other products, treats rape as an individual incident rather than a systemic and pervasive problem. Despite the never ending stream of prevention products, the statistics haven’t improved.

— 

Unfortunately, This Magical Anti-Rape Nail Polish Won’t Save Us

(x)

2:39pm
8 notes

California Legislature Passes 'Yes Means Yes' Bill →

Sen. Kevin de Leon, D-Los Angeles, said his bill would begin a paradigm shift in how California campuses prevent and investigate sexual assault. Rather than using the refrain “no means no,” the definition of consent under the bill requires “an affirmative, conscious and voluntary agreement to engage in sexual activity.” Earlier versions of the bill had similar language.

"With this measure, we will lead the nation in bringing standards and protocols across the board so we can create an environment that’s healthy, that’s conducive for all students, not just for women, but for young men as well too, so young men can develop healthy patterns and boundaries as they age with the opposite sex," de Leon said before the vote.

Silence or lack of resistance does not constitute consent. The legislation says it’s also not consent if the person is drunk, drugged, unconscious or asleep.

June 5, 2014 at 11:55am
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andhereshowiseeit said: A petition to change Williams college sexual assault policy has received over 3,000 signatures attempting to end rape violence on campus. Google williams sexual assault petition to see more. & go to the williams record to read more about the victims story

Hello! Thank you your response. Two of SAFER’s board members are Williams alums and we are aware of the petition. 

May 22, 2014 at 8:00am
15 notes
I have got nothing to be ashamed of.

I have got nothing to be ashamed of.

May 21, 2014 at 4:01pm
27 notes
You can get raped, but not protest against rape.

You can get raped, but not protest against rape.